Education

  • Lamps
  • Ballasts
  • Glossary
  • Trouble-shooting

Lamps

The chart below gives the general comparison of fluorescent lamps to the incandescent lamps listed on the left. Please note the chart does not list the approximate annual energy savings for fluorescent or the lamp replacement costs. Consult your local utility for the cost per watt to determine energy savings.

INCANDESCENT
Lamp Type Lamp Life Lamp Lumens
APPROXIMATE FLUORESCENT LAMP EQUIVALENTS
Lamp Type Lamp Life Lamp Lumens
  • 150W A21
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2,850
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • (3) 13W Twin Tube
  • 40W Twin Tube
  • 40W T12 Straight Tube
  • 32W T8 Straight Tube
  • 10,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 20,000 hrs
  • 2,700
  • 3,150
  • 3,150
     
  • 2,800
  • 3) 100W A19
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 4,800
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • (2) 40W T12 U-Bend
  • (2) 32W T8 Straight Tube
  • (2) 40W T12 Straight Tube
  • (2) 28W T5 Straight Tube
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 5,520
  • 5,600
     
  • 6,300
     
  • 5,800
     
  • 2) 100W A19
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  • 3,200
  •  
  •  
  • 32/40W Circline
  • (2) 21W T5 Straight Tube
  • (2) 26W Quad Tube
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 20,000 hrs
  • 4,300
  • 4,200
     
  • 4,200
  • 100W A19
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1,600
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • (2) 13W Twin Tube
  • (2) 22W Circline
  • 32W Circline
  • 30W T12 Straight Tube
  • 10,000 hrs
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 1,800
  • 2,100
  • 1,800
  • 4,200
     
  • (2) 75W A19
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  • 1,220
  •  
  •  
  • 32W Circline
  • (2) 20W T12 Straight Tube
  • (2) 14W T5 Straight Lamp
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 9,000 hrs
     
  • 20,000 hrs
     
  • 1,800
  • 2,400
     
  • 2,700
     
  • 75W A19
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 750 hrs
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1,200
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 22W Circline
  • 20W T12 Straight Tube
  • (2) 9W Twin Tube
  • 17W T8 Straight Tube
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 9,000 hrs
     
  • 10,000 hrs
  • 20,000 hrs
  • 1,050
  • 1,200
     
  • 900
  • 1,325
  • 60W A19
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 1,000 hrs
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 890
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • (2) 7W Twin Tube
  • 20W Circline
  • 13W Twin Tube
  • 13W T5 Straight Tube
  • 10,000 hrs
  • 12,000 hrs
  • 10,000 hrs
  • 7,500 hrs
  • 800
  • 1,050
  • 900
  • 820
  • 40W A19
  •  
  •  
  • 1,000 hrs
  •  
  •  
  • 495
  •  
  •  
  • 8W T5 Straight Tube
  • 7W Twin Tube
  • 9W Twin Tube
  • 7,500 hrs
  • 10,00 hrs
  • 10,00 hrs
  • 400
  • 400
  • 600

Note: Fluorescent lamps experience starting problems when ambient temperature is below 60F. The chart is for general comparison only. Light output shown is initial lumens as published by North American Phillips. Ballast factors are not considered.

Ballasts

The chart below gives the general comparison of fluorescent lamps to the incandescent lamps listed on the left. Please note the chart does not list the approximate annual energy savings for fluorescent or the lamp replacement costs. Consult your local utility for the cost per watt to determine energy savings.

Ballast Type: R8
Description: Residential electronic - Normal
Power Factor
Lamp Watts: 32
Lamp Size: T8
Lamp Description: F32T8/TL471
Life Hours: 20,000
Approx Input Watts: 56
Initial Delivered Lumens: 5016
Ballast Type: E8
Description: Electronic Octron (commercial use)
fully electronic ballast
Lamp Watts: 32
Lamp Size: T8
Lamp Description: F32T8/TL741
Life Hours: 20,000
Approx Input Watts: 58
Initial Delivered Lumens: 5192

Glossary

BALLAST FACTOR
Ratio of a lamp’s light output on ballast compared to the lamp’s rated light output. The higher the ballast factor, the more light delivered.

CIRCLE E BALLAST
Indicates special EPACT compliant version of ballast. Check the laws and codes for specific applications.

COLOR RENDERING INDEX
CRI-indicates how true to color lighted objects appear. A higher number means truer color. The CRI creates light sources on a scale of 0 to 100. The higher the CRI the more vibrant or close to natural the colors the objects appear.

COLOR TEMPERATURE OR CHROMATICITY
The appearance of the light that comes from a light source. The color temperature is measured in Kelvin or “k”. The higher the color temperature, the visually cooler or bluer the light appears.

ELECTRONIC BALLAST
A ballast that utilizes electronic components to transform current at high frequency to operate fluorescent or discharge lamps.

FOOTCANDLE
The measurement of the amount of light reaching the surface. Footcandles are measured in lumens per square foot.

LAMP EFFICACY
Different lamp types have different abilities to convert electrical power (watts) into visible light (lumens). The quality of light emitted is divided by the input power to determine the lamps efficacy. This is expressed as lumens per watt LPW.

LIFE
How long on average a bulb is estimated to last. The number of burning hours on average after which 50% of representative groups of lamps in tests under controlled burning conditions and at a specified number of burning hours per start have failed.

LPW
Lumens per watt is a measure of energy efficiency. Fluorescent lamps are very energy efficient and emit up to 100 lumens per watt.

LUMENS
Bulb brightness. A higher number means brighter light. Fluorescent lamp lumens decrease over its life.

MAGNETIC BALLAST
A ballast that uses core and coil assembly to transform electrical current to start and operate fluorescent lamps.

OCTRON BALLAST
A ballast designed to operate 1” diameter, T8 fluorescent R.S. lamps. It is not compatible with T12 or preheat lamps.

POWER FACTOR
The ratio of power(watts) to volt-amps of the ballast. The power factor ratio may be used to determine how efficiently total input power is being used.

Troubleshooting

It is important to know which ballast is in the fluorescent fixture and which lamp is compatible with that ballast. Not using the correct lamp may result in ballast overheating, ballast thermal cycling or premature failure. AFX products offer superior ballasting, but it is very important to use the proper lamp for optimum performance. Here are several tips for ballast troubleshooting:

SYMPTOM CORRECTIVE ACTION
Lamps will not operate.
  • 1. Check if there is power to the fixture.
  • 2. Be sure lamp is properly seated in socket.
  • 3. Replace the lamp.
  • 4. Reseat or change starter (preheat only).
  • 5. Check wiring connections.
  • 6. Test ballast.
Slow or erratic starting.
  • 1. Check ground (fixture must be grounded for reliable starting).
  • 2. Check ballast label for correct lamp.
  • 3. Check for low voltage supply.
  • 4. Be sure lamp is correctly seated in socket.
  • 5. Test ballast.
Excessive noise.
  • 1. Tighten loose components.
  • 2. Install ballasts of the proper sound rating.
  • 3. Replace faulty ballast(s). Normal operation should resume.
  • 4. Note: All fluorescent ballasts emit some noise.
Lamp(s) are cycling.
  • 1. Check air temperature in and around fixture.
  • 2. Check ballast and coil temperature - ballast case temperatures should not exceed 90C and coil temperatures should not exceed 105C.
  • 3. Remove building insulation from above fixtures to allow heat dissipation.
  • 4. Replace faulty ballast(s). Normal operation should resume.
Interference
  • 1. Radios and antenna must be 4 - 10 feet from lamps.
  • 2. Correct condition by use of radio interference filters.